February 9, 2016

Stitchy Snippets - Embroidered Minatures


The contemporary embroiderer, Sophia Narrett, is currently in residence at Lux Art Institute in Encinitas which will conclude in an exhibition. 'The show will consist of new work made on site, as well as some of the embroideries I have created over the past few years.' says Narrett.


For many years Narrett focused on painting and she found her preference for embroidery by serendipity. 'I just love working with the material' Narrett explains. 'I began making art as an oil painter. I struggled because I was always more interested in the idea of an image rather than in physically working with the paint.'


Narrett finds much inspiration in pop culture and her most recent work was influenced by her favorite TV shows, which are a constant influx as she sits before them and works on her embroideries: 'I watch a lot of TV — or listen to it while I sew. I love long-form narratives. Reality shows or dramas that go on for a while.' 'This Meant Nothing' is a four-part sequence inspired by the popular TV series 'The Bachelor'. Sophia adopts the means of a film set and re-creates real TV characters to illustrate her own fantasy narrative. Her childhood affection for doll play is ever present and is led into an adult world through erotic themes.


The layers and interplay of thread in the embroideries add even more detail to Narrett's incredibly complex compositions. The embroideries are hung inches away from the wall creating natural shadows and the pieces are each given an organic, formed frame with threads that cascade and dance drawing the viewer in.



Hi, I'm Julia - an embroidery enthusiast based in Amsterdam with a lifelong passion for textiles. I like to mix things up by combining different techniques and mediums - my origami styled dress won the Hand & Lock embroidery prize. Join me on my exploration of embroidery with mixed media and fibre art.

February 8, 2016

MooshieStitch Monday: Woven Picot Stitch



Are you looking to add some dimension to your embroidery? Then let's learn the woven picot stitch!

I was first intimidated by this stitch. It looked like it had to be difficult. But you know what, it really isn't that hard! 

Better yet, if you already know the woven trellis stitch, the woven picot will be even easier since you follow the same weaving method.


Let's begin!


Take a pin and stick it in your fabric.

Come up from the back of the fabric on the left side of the pin with your needle and thread (how far away from the pin will depend on how wide you want your woven picot to be) and then wrap the thread around the back of the pin top.

(Please excuse the blue circle drawn on the fabric in the photos below. I know, it looks strange. It is my guide for building my flower with the woven picots - so hopefully it isn't too confusing and will make more sense later in the post.)


Bring the needle down through the fabric on the right side of the pin about the same distance as the left side.


Bring the needle up through the back of the fabric just to the left of the pin and wrap around the pin top again.


Now you will begin weaving.

First row weave from the right to left: under / over / under.


Next row weave from left to right doing the opposite: over / under / over.



Continue this process until you reach the bottom.


All done weaving.


Pull out the pin and you are finished!

Here are a few pics of what it looks with pin removed and the woven picot lifted away from the fabric to give you an idea of the dimension.


Pretty cool, huh?

I am using a #5 perle cotton thread. I hardly ever stitch with perle cotton but I read that the woven picot looks best when stitched with a thread that has a good twist to it (like a perle cotton).


I continued to stitch more woven picots around my blue circle to create my flower petals.







Then, I added french knots for the flower center with yellow DMC floss (all six strands).

Here are some more photos just to show the dimension of the stitch.






Have you ever tried the woven picot? Post your photos in the Flickr Embroidery Group!


P.S. I learned the woven picot from watching Mary Corbet's video tutorial. Check it out!




Hi! I'm Michelle (aka Mooshie) and I've been stitching since 2007. I own more embroidery hoops than I will ever need and am a borderline hoarder of floss. In my spare time I'm hanging out with my dog Sega, planning my next hike, or trying to convince my husband to draw me embroidery patterns. You can find me on my blog, MooshieStitch and Flickr.

February 5, 2016

Friday Instagram Finds No. 38 with @naive_needle


Hello Stitchers! It's Friday - hooray! I'm excited because in two days I'll be headed to sunny Florida with my son to visit my parents. It will be nice to leave the colder temps in Chicagoland for the sunshine of Orlando!

Today I'm introducing you to Anna of the Instagram account @naive_needle. Anna creates pretty hand embroidery, and what strikes me most about her pieces is that she often uses satin stitch or needle painting to fill spaces in her work. The results are beautifully composed embroidery pieces that are colorful and pretty. Her "flower flamingo" is particularly clever. I came across Anna's work because she tagged some of her pictures with #feelingstitchyig.Take a look!

@naive_needle

Image by @naive_needle

Image by @naive_needle

Image by @naive_needle

I hope you enjoyed this week's edition of Friday Instagram Finds! Join in the conversation by commenting below. While you're on Instagram checking out Anna's work at @naive_needle make sure you follow Feeling Stitchy! We'd love for you to stop by and say hello. You can find Feeling Stitchy on Instagram at the handle @feelingstitchyish. You can find Amy @randomactsofamy on Instagram.

Want to be featured in Friday Instagram Find? Tag your best stitch-related photos with #feelingstitchyig!
 

Hi, I'm Amy - I feature interesting embroidery and stitch-related photos I find on Instagram. Use #feelingstitchyig on Instagram for pictures you want me to find.

Find me on: Instagram | Random Acts of Amy | Etsy

January 29, 2016

Friday Instagram Finds No. 37 with Sew Jenaissance


Welcome back, Stitchers! I hope you've had a pleasant week, and have fun plans and activities for the weekend. Today let's take a look at Jen of the Instagram account @sewjenaissance. Jen creates colorfully geometric works, and embellishes printed fabrics with hand embroidery. I love her series of gnomes. In one of the pictures below, you can see the before and after, and how much texture the hand embroidery brings to the fabric. I'm sure you think like I do; embroidery makes everything look better! Jen's geometric pieces are super cool, and remind me of Spirograph designs. Take a look!

@sewjenaissance

Image by @sewjenaissance

Image by @sewjenaissance

Image by @sewjenaissance

Image by @sewjenaissance
That's it for this week's edition of Friday Instagram Finds! Join in the conversation by commenting below. While you're on Instagram checking out Jen's work at @sewjenaissance make sure you follow Feeling Stitchy! We'd love for you to stop by and say hello. You can find Feeling Stitchy on Instagram at the handle @feelingstitchyish. You can find Amy @randomactsofamy on Instagram.



Want to be featured in Friday Instagram Find? Tag your best stitch-related photos with #feelingstitchyig!

Hi, I'm Amy - I feature interesting embroidery and stitch-related photos I find on Instagram. Use #feelingstitchyig on Instagram for pictures you want me to find.

Find me on: Instagram | Random Acts of Amy | Etsy

January 26, 2016

Stitchy Snippets - Counting Threads


In keeping with it's regal name, the British Royal School of Needlework is centred at Hampton Court Palace which stands grandly alongside the river Thames. The school teaches the traditional practice of embroidery which has been passed down through the centuries. The training focuses on precise and exact techniques and can be rigorous at times for the amateur such as myself. Not dissimilar to a Kung Fu student who is put through their paces, although using far less muscle.


Attending a class at the school is truly enjoyable, especially in such an awesome setting. As I sat tucked away in the light airy galleries of the palace, overlooking the manicured gardens I wondered if there could be a more apt location to do drawn thread work. This type of embroidery is often grouped with Whitework as it is usually practiced on white linen, embellished in white and often combines several types of embroidery. A key feature of this style is to cut warp or weft threads away from the base fabric and embellish the remaining threads which creates a lace effect.


The preparation requires a lot of patience as threads should be counted accurately in order to follow the pattern (which posed a challenge first thing on a Saturday morning). Traditionally, the stripped threads are woven back into the fabric to leave a seamless edge. Once the preparation is underway the stitching is relatively straightforward although I found that the stitches that at first appeared simpler were the most difficult to execute well.


The action of deconstructing and reconstructing the fabric is very fulfilling and the delicate outcome that is produced has a unique finish and effect compared to other types of needlework.


Hi, I'm Julia - an embroidery enthusiast based in Amsterdam with a lifelong passion for textiles. I like to mix things up by combining different techniques and mediums - my origami styled dress won the Hand & Lock embroidery prize. Join me on my exploration of embroidery with mixed media and fibre art.

January 22, 2016

Friday Instagram Finds No. 36 with Be Good Natured


Hello Stitchers! It's Friday again, and I'm going to jump right in to this week's featured needle artist Dani of @begoodnatured. I have to admit, I'm a bit in awe of Dani's talent. I'm amazed by artistry with felted wool. Her account is one of my favorites on Instagram. I just love the pet pieces she creates. We had to say goodbye to our dear Pitbull/Labrador Retriever mix Mina on 12/19/2015, and I've been looking through my photos to find just the right one to commission Dani to create a beautiful memento. Take a look at her beautiful artistry!

@begoodnatured

Image by @begoodnatured

Image by @begoodnatured

Image by @begoodnatured

Image by @begoodnatured
That's it for this week's edition of Friday Instagram Finds! Join in the conversation by commenting below. While you're on Instagram checking out Dani's work at @begoodnatured make sure you follow Feeling Stitchy! We'd love for you to stop by and say hello. You can find Feeling Stitchy on Instagram at the handle @feelingstitchyish. You can find Amy @randomactsofamy on Instagram.

Want to be featured in Friday Instagram Find? Tag your best stitch-related photos with #feelingstitchyig!

Hi, I'm Amy - I feature interesting embroidery and stitch-related photos I find on Instagram. Use #feelingstitchyig on Instagram for pictures you want me to find.

Find me on: Instagram | Random Acts of Amy | Etsy

January 18, 2016

MooshieStitch Monday: Winter Woven Trees



Happy New Year!

Since some of you readers may be experiencing snow - here is a little "winter" themed project.

I have become slightly obsessed with the woven trellis stitch. I wanted to use it to stitch something other than a flower so I decided to try stitching little pine trees.

I practiced a few trees by drawing some triangles and followed the same steps as the woven trellis stitch.


needle woven trees



Once complete - turn the triangle around and it looks like a little pine tree ... right?





To make a little wintery tree scene, I roughly drew some trees on linen inside a little oval hoop - something different since I always use round hoops.




For the snow covered ground, I cut a piece of white felt and whip stitched it to the fabric.





Then added the tree trunks with straight stitches.




Now time to weave the trees!


woven trellis stitch

woven trellis stitch



needle weaving trees




I added some french knots and little eye stitches for snow flakes.




If I would have finished stitching this before the holidays, my plan was to decorate the trees by stitching little ornaments on them, or adding a star on top each tree. Maybe next year.....


P.S. To finish the back of the hoop - I followed this excellent tutorial.


See you next time!


Hi! I'm Michelle (aka Mooshie) and I've been stitching since 2007. I own more embroidery hoops than I will ever need and am a borderline hoarder of floss. In my spare time I'm hanging out with my dog Sega, planning my next hike, or trying to convince my husband to draw me embroidery patterns. You can find me on my blog, MooshieStitch and Flickr.

SITE DESIGN BY RYLEE BLAKE DESIGNS